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After Preview you can use the online Undergraduate Catalog to research academic programs and their requirements:

Are you considering changing majors? Are you uncertain of your choice? If so, see

Are you bringing in credits from high school? Incoming credit by exam (AP, IB, AICE) should be posted on your transcript by the end of July. If you don't see your exam credit posted, contact the appropriate testing board to have a score report sent to UF.

Do you have dual enrollment credit? You can verify that UF has received these credits by viewing your transcript on ISIS (select 'Transcripts' in the right-hand menu). If there is no record, be sure to request that the college or university where you took courses sends a transcript to UF's Office of Admissions.

UF students talking together

Each semester prior to advance registration, the Schedule of Courses is published to let you know what course offerings will be available for the upcoming semester. Use the schedule to find course times, search for general education courses, identify registration dates and find textbook information.
For you first semester, you can use the list of courses below to view classes appropriate for first-year students.

Courses for Freshmen, by Category
The types of assignments and tests for each course are determined by the instructor and may be different for each section of a course. Please review the individual course description for any prerequisites. The department that teaches each course is italicized.
This information is subject to change.



Biological Sciences Courses (GE-B)
An asterisk (*) indicates the course is taught in the Summer B term.
If you are a science, engineering or pre-health major, you will have many or all of the required Biological and Physical Sciences courses as part of your major's required courses.

Agronomy
PLS 2003C Plants That Feed the World (3)
Introduction to 25 of humankind's most important food crop plants with emphasis on soil and climatic adaptations, major producers and consumers, nutritional attributes, processing needs and types of products. Students will see the plants and seeds, and the food and industrial products of the crop plants under study. This is an introductory course for majors and non-majors who have no previous academic experience with food crop plants.

Animal Science
ANS 2002 The Meat We Eat (3)
Consumer oriented elective covering meat as a food, its inspection for wholesomeness, meat grading, identification, processing, selection, preparation and serving. Preparation of economical, nutritious and palatable meals centered around meat will be emphasized.

Anthropology
ANT 3514C Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4)
Introduction to subfield of anthropology that focuses on the natural history of humankind. Through lecture and laboratory, the course surveys a range of materials that focus on the diversity of the Order Primates with emphasis on human and primate variation, adaptation and evolution.

Biology
BSC 2009 Biological Sciences (3)
A comprehensive introduction to living systems, including the scientific basis of biology, cell structure and function, genetic mechanisms, animal and plant anatomy and physiology, and ecology and evolutionary processes. Recommended for students not majoring in the natural sciences.

BSC 2009L Laboratory in Biological Sciences (1)
A laboratory for students who need experience in a nonprofessionally oriented laboratory or for those who need laboratory experience to satisfy requirements for graduation.

BSC 2930 Phage Genomics (2)
Special topics in general biology.

BOT 2010C Introductory Botany (3)
Structures and functions of cells, tissues and organs of flowering plants. Students with credit in APB 2150, BSC 2009 or BSC 2010 cannot register for this course; they should take BOT 2011C.

BOT 2800C Plants in Human Affairs (3)
The role of plants in the development of civilization and the influence of plants on world history, politics, economics and culture. A survey of useful and harmful plants and plant products.

Communication Sciences and Disorders
SPA 2109 Language Breakdown in the Brain (3)
Introduction to brain structures as they relate to language development and use. The course also emphasizes the effects of damage or developmental anomalies in different brain areas.

Entomology and Nematology
ENY 1001* Bugs and People (3)
Introductory course for lower-division students who want to learn popular information about insects and associated organisms.

ENY 2040* The Insects (3)
An introduction to insect biology, insect-organism interaction and insect association with man. Features discussion of basic biological principles using insects as examples.

Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
FAS 2024 Global and Regional Perspectives in Fisheries (3)
Fish biology, ecology and habitats relevant to fisheries on both a global and regional (Florida) scale. Follows the fisheries occurring from cold, mountain rivers to the depths of the oceans, with special topics (e.g., artificial reefs, fisheries bycatch and aquaculture). Intended for non-science and science majors.

Forest Resources and Conservation
FOR 3004 Forests, Conservation and People (3)
A general background course for non-FRC students interested in management, use and conservation of forest resources. Topics include resource description, historical perspectives, current issues, forest biology and management principles.

Food Science and Human Nutrition
FOS 2001* Man's Food (3)
Discussion of current nutrition and food science topics concerning nutritional quality and safety of foods as they relate to one's health. For science and nonscience students.

Geography
GEO 3315 Geography of Crop Plants (3)
Study of the biological structure, means of survival, propagation and distribution of plants, with emphasis on their relationship to the culture and diffusion of man throughout the world and his part in their development and improvement.

Geological Sciences
GLY 1102* Age of Dinosaurs (3; GE-B or P)
Examination of unique episodes in the physical and biological history of the earth.

Horticultural Sciences
VEC 2100* World Herbs and Vegetables (3)
Introduces students to a variety of vegetables and culinary herbs. Emphasis placed on genetic, phytochemical and botanical diversity and importance of food phytochemicals and role of vegetables in nutrition.

Microbiology and Cell Science
MCB 2000 Microbiology (3)
The role of microorganisms in chemical transformations, disease, public health and agriculture. Fundamental concepts are discussed, followed by beneficial and harmful actions of microorganisms as they affect our lives. Suitable as a general education science course, but not acceptable for admission to advanced microbiology courses nor for the preprofessional curricula required for the medical/veterinary sciences.

Plant Pathology
PLP 2000* Plants, Plagues and People (3; GE-B or H; not offered fall)
Biology and history of the human species for non-science majors. Course is presented chronologically from the origin of life to the present with emphasis on the impact that plants, animals and diseases have had and are having on human civilizations.

Soil and Water Science
SWS 2008 Land and Life (3)
Relationships between human activities and soil and environmental quality. Lectures concentrate on the fundamentals of soil and environmental science using case studies to illustrate basic principles. Intended for non-majors.

Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
WIS 2040* Wildlife Issues in a Changing World (3)
The biological and ecological basis of wildlife issues and the pathways humans use to resolve these issues. Topics include major animal phyla; evolutionary history of vertebrates; state, federal and international agencies that manage wildlife worldwide; and the impact of human activities on wildlife.

WIS 2552 Biodiversity Conservation: Global Perspectives (3; also GE-N)
The relationship between humans and the global biotic environment that supports them. This course explores human patterns of resource use and population biology that determine the status of the earth's biodiversity resources. The course helps students understand how today's human society affects global life support systems, and how individuals can make lifetime contributions to environmental solutions.

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Physical Sciences Courses (GE-P)
An asterisk (*) indicates the course is taught in the Summer B term.
If you are a science, engineering or pre-health major, you will have many or all of the required Biological and Physical Sciences courses as part of your major's required courses

Astronomy
AST 1002* Discovering the Universe (3)
An elementary, largely nonmathematical survey of our universe of stars, planets and galaxies. Acquaints the student with the development of astronomy as a human activity - with how we know as well as what we know. Primarily for those not majoring in physical science or mathematics.

AST 1022L* Astronomy Laboratory (1)
An introduction to experimental work in astronomy including scheduled laboratory exercises during the day in the teaching lab and evening observational astronomy at the on-campus teaching observatory.

AST 2003 Introduction to the Solar System (3)
Survey of the solar system including the sun, planets, satellites, asteroids, meteorites and comets.

AST 2004 Introduction to Stars and Galaxy (3)
Overview of cosmology, the study of the large-scale structure and history of the universe, in four components: ideas about the universe as a whole predating the twentieth century; ideas from twentieth century physics that impact modern cosmology; stars, black holes, galaxies and quasars as probes of the universe; and the Hot Big Bang Model.

AST 2037 Life in the Universe (3)
The origin of life on Earth and the possibility of life elsewhere. A multidisciplinary approach is followed. Conditions for life to form and the likelihood that such conditions may exist elsewhere in the universe are discussed. Also considered are schemes proposed for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI).

AST 3043* History of Astronomy through Newton (3; GE-H or P, and N)
Astronomy from its beginnings through Newton. Emphasis is on the works of Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo and Newton.

Chemistry
CHM 1025* Introduction to Chemistry (2)
Introductory readiness course in general chemistry for those with weak yet satisfactory backgrounds in high school chemistry and algebra.

CHM 1030 Basic Chemistry Concepts and Applications 1 (3)
The first half of the CHM 1030/1031 sequence. A terminal sequence for nonscience students that presents chemistry from a medical/nursing perspective. Topics in inorganic chemistry and properties of both ionic and covalent compounds.

CHM 2045 General Chemistry (3)
The first semester of the CHM 2045/2045L and CHM 2046/2046L sequence. Stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, the states of matter, reaction rates and equilibria. A minimum grade of C is required to progress to CHM 2046.

CHM 2045L General Chemistry Laboratory (1)
Laboratory experiments designed to reflect the topics presented in CHM 2045.

CHM 2095 Chemistry for Engineers 1 (3)
The first semester of the CHM 2095/2096 sequence. Topics include stoichiometry, energy and thermodynamics, atomic and molecular structure, the states of matter, reaction rates and an introduction to chemical equilibria. All topics are taught in an engineering case-study context.

Geography
GEO 2200* Physical Geography (3)
A study of the development and distribution of landforms, climates, minerals, soils and water resources. Interrelationships among the physical environment and regional patterns formed by these elements are analyzed against man's utilization of them.

GEO 2200L* Physical Geography Laboratory (1)
Laboratory in physical geography, for lab science credit.

GEO 2242* Extreme Weather (3)
Introduction to the science of weather (what we get short term) and climate (what we expect long term) and current scientific developments in such areas as extreme weather prediction, global climate change and improved forecasting of events.

GEO 3341 Extreme Floods (3; also GE-N)
Examines the world's most extreme floods from the Pleistocene through present due to various causes. Discusses physical and human aspects of flood warning, preparedness, response and recovery throughout the world.

Geological Sciences
GLY 1000 Exploring the Geological Sciences (3)
Selected topics in the geological sciences. Designed for the student not majoring in science.

GLY 1102* Age of Dinosaurs (3; GE-B or P)
Examination of unique episodes in the physical and biological history of the earth.

GLY 1150L* Florida Geology Laboratory (1)
Laboratory course providing a basic understanding of Florida's geology, geologic history, geologic resources and geologically related environmental problems.

GLY 1880 Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Other Hazards (3)
An overview of important topics in Earth science through the examination of hazards, ranging from earthquakes and volcanoes to global warming and impacts from space. Designed for students who are not majoring in science.

GLY 2010C Physical Geology (4)
Materials, structures and surface features of the earth and processes which have produced them. Related laboratory demonstrations and experiences.

GLY 2030C Environmental and Engineering Geology (3)
Hazardous geologic processes and current environmental concerns are related to the earth, the forces acting upon it and the resulting surface features and materials. Human interaction with the environment is illustrated using modern case studies.

GLY 3163 Geology American National Parks (3)
Introduction to geological concepts in the context of selected US national parks. Course relates geology to the cultural aspects of these parks and present-day environmental concerns.

OCE 1001* Introductory Oceanography (3)
History of oceanography; distribution of Earth's land and water; nature and relief of the sea's floor; physical and chemical properties of sea water; sea ice; sound in the sea; tides, currents and waves; marine sedimentation.

Physics
MET 1010 Introduction to Weather and Climate (3)
A course for non-science students interested in understanding the phenomena of daily weather. Several principles of physics are introduced.

PHY 1033C Discovering Physics (3)
The fundamental concepts of physics that shape a scientist's view of the laws of nature. A laboratory experience is included to emphasize the importance of measurement for the testing of scientific hypotheses.

PHY 2004 Applied Physics 1 (3)
Emphasizes the practical applications of basic physics to a range of professions, including architecture, agricultural sciences, building construction and forest resources. Mechanics of motion, forces, energy, momentum, wave motion and heat.

PHY 2004L Laboratory for PHY 2004 (1)
Laboratory experience illustrating the practical applications of basic physics, including the mechanics of motion, forces, energy, momentum, wave motion and heat.

PHY 2020* Introduction to Principles of Physics (3)
Fundamental principles of physics in mechanics, electricity and modern physics as applied to conservation laws. An in-depth analysis of selected topics with lecture demonstration, films and other teaching aids.

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus 1 (3)
The first of a two-semester sequence of physics for scientists and engineers. The course covers Newtonian mechanics and includes motion, vectors, Newton's laws, work and conservation of energy, systems of particles, collisions, equilibrium, oscillations and waves.

PHY 2048L Laboratory for PHY 2048 (1)
Laboratory experience for PHY 2048 illustrating the practical applications of Newtonian mechanics.

PHY 2053 Physics 1 (3)
First semester of introductory physics de-emphasizing calculus. Structure and properties of matter; kinematics, dynamics and statics; momentum and energy; rotation, elasticity; vibration; fluids; temperature and expansion, heat transfer, thermal behavior of gases; wave motion and sound.

PHY 2053L Laboratory for PHY 2053 (1)
Laboratory experience for PHY 2053 illustrating the practical applications of the structure and properties of matter; kinematics, dynamics and statics; momentum and energy; rotation, elasticity; vibration; fluids; temperature and expansion, heat transfer, thermal behavior of gases; wave motion and sound.

Soil and Water Science
SWS 2007 World of Water (3)
The full range of water issues including abundance and quality of water in the environment, water policy and conflict.

SWS 3022 Introduction to Soils in the Environment (3)
Fundamentals of soil science emphasizing the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils in relation to growth of native and agricultural plants and environmental uses.

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Composition Courses (GE-C)
An asterisk (*) indicates the course is taught in the Summer B term.
If you have an SAT verbal score of 640 or lower or an ACT verbal score of 28 or lower AND you do not have credit for any college-level English composition courses, then the first composition course you will take is ENC 1101.

English
AML 2070* Survey of American Literature (3; also GE-H; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in the history of American literature. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

AML 2410 Issues in American Literature and Culture (3; or GE-H; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the most important issues that arise in the study of American literature and culture. The breadth and focus of the topic will be determined by the instructor.

CRW 1101* Beginning Fiction Writing (3; WR-6)
A beginning workshop in writing fiction. The class starts with the basics and students read a lot of fiction (you can't be a fiction writer without reading shelves of fiction). Students will write stories and their fiction will be discussed in workshop.

CRW 1301* Beginning Poetry Writing (3; WR-6)
This workshop concentrates on the basics of reading and writing poetry (in order to write you have to read, and in order to be a reader you have to be a critic). Students write poems and some will be discussed in workshop.

ENC 1145 Topics for Composition (3; or GE-H; WR-6)
Instruction in expository-argumentative writing related to one special topic selected by the instructor. Readings will include variable genres from different disciplines.

ENC 2210* Technical Writing (3; WR-6; not offered fall)
A survey of the forms and methods of communication used in business, industry and government, including nonformal and formal reports, letters, resumes and proposals.

ENG 1131* Writing Through Media (4; or GE-H; WR-6)
This course is the media studies equivalent of ENC 1102, Writing About Literature. It explores the practices of literacy in the context of popular culture, including cinema, television, advertising, popular fiction and journalism.

ENG 2300* Film Analysis (4; or GE-H; WR-6)
An introduction to thinking and writing about the cinema by means of film theory and history.

ENL 2012 Survey of English Literature: Medieval to 1750 (3; or GE-H; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in the history of the period. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

ENL 2022* Survey of English Literature: 1750 to the Present (3; or GE-H; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in the history of the period. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

LIT 2110 World Literature: Ancient to Renaissance (3; GE-C or H, and GE-N; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in the history of the period. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

LIT 2120 World Literature: 17th Century to Modern (3; GE-C or H, and GE-N; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in history of the period. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

Written and Oral Communication
ENC 3254* Professional Communication for Engineers (3; WR-6)
Expressly designed for engineering students, this course focuses on the composition and presentation of the technical proposal in addition to other common communication tasks in the field, such as giving instructions, making progress reports and preparing applications.

Writing Program
ENC 1101 Introduction to College Writing (3; WR-6)
Writing techniques and forms of argument in a range of disciplines. For their major writing assignment in this course, students will write an extensively researched and well-documented research paper, learning professional and academic writing conventions and developing their critical thinking skills.

ENC 1102* Introduction to Argument and Persuasion (3; WR-6)
Writing techniques and forms of argument in a range of disciplines. For their major writing assignment in this course, students will write an extensively researched and well-documented research paper, learning professional and academic writing conventions and developing their critical thinking skills.

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Mathematics Courses (GE-M)
An asterisk (*) indicates the course is taught in the Summer B term.
The math requirement requires completion of six credits of coursework in mathematics with minimum grades of C. Three credits must be in mathematics and the other three credits can be in mathematics, statistics and/or certain computer science or logic courses. Look for an M in the WM column of the Schedule of Courses for verification. You will work with an adviser at Preview to determine what math course(s) to take, so you do not need to select any here. Not all majors require a math course the first semester. If you are interested in a major that requires MAC 1140 or higher, be sure to take ALEKS, the math placement exam.

Computer and Information Science and Engineering
CGS 2531 Problem Solving Using Computer Software (3; MR)
A problem-solving introduction and thorough exploration of word processing, spreadsheet analysis, database management, multimedia presentations, e-mail and the Internet. Topics also include hardware, software and information technology. The problem-solving approach also aids students in their majors.

Mathematics
MAC 1105 Basic College Algebra (3; MR; online only)
An online entry-level algebra course for college students.

MAC 1114* Trigonometry (2; MR)
Exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry and analytic and additional applications of trigonometry.

MAC 1140* Precalculus Algebra (3; MR)
College algebra, functions, coordinate geometry, exponential and logarithmic functions.

MAC 1147* Precalculus: Algebra and Trigonometry (4; MR)
College algebra, functions, coordinate geometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometry. This fast-paced course is designed as a review of algebra and trigonometry to prepare the student for calculus. This course assumes prior knowledge of intermediate algebra (Algebra 2) and trigonometry.

MAC 2233* Survey of Calculus 1 (3; MR)
A geometric and heuristic approach to calculus; differentiation and integration of simple algebraic and exponential functions; applications to graphing, marginal analysis, optimization, areas and volumes.

MAC 2311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1 (4; MR)
Introduction to analytic geometry; limits; continuity; differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; applications of the derivative; inverse trigonometric functions; differentials; introduction to integration; and the fundamental theorem of calculus. (Note: Credit will be given for, at most, one of MAC 2233, MAC 2311 and MAC 3472.)

MAC 2312 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2 (4; MR)
Techniques of integration; applications of integration; differentiation and integration of inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; sequences and series. (Note: Credit will be given for, at most, one of MAC 2312, MAC 2512 and MAC 3473.)

MGF 1106* Mathematics for Liberal Arts Majors 1 (3; MR)
Course is designed for non-science and non-business majors who need to fulfill the writing and math and general education math requirements. The course includes an introduction to set theory, logic, number theory, probability, statistics, graphing and linear programming.

MGF 1107* Mathematics for Liberal Arts Majors 2 (3; MR)
A general-education course that demonstrates the beauty and utility of mathematics. Topics include financial management, linear and exponential growth, mathematics in the arts and discrete mathematics. This course does not require the student to have taken MGF 1106.

Philosophy
PHI 2100* Logic (3; MR; not offered in fall)
An introductory-level survey of different methods of formal and informal analysis of the logical structure of propositions and arguments. Topics include syllogistic logic, propositional logic, quantification logic, inductive logic, informal fallacies and probability.

Statistics
STA 2023 Introduction to Statistics 1 (3; MR)
Graphical and numerical descriptive measures. Simple linear regression. Basic probability concepts, random variables, sampling distributions, central limit theorem. Large and small sample confidence intervals and significance tests for parameters associated with a single population and for comparison of two populations. Use of statistical computer software and computer applets to analyze data and explore new concepts.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences Courses (GE-S)
An asterisk (*) indicates the course is taught in the Summer B term.

African Studies
AFS 2002* African Experience (3; also GE-N; not offered in fall)
Introductory study of African society and culture that examines the richness, diversity and time-depth of African civilizations.

Anthropology
ANT 2000* General Anthropology (3)
Introduction to the four subfields of anthropology (sociocultural, biological, linguistic and archeology) through analyses of the cultural, social and biological dimensions of human variation. Appropriate first course for students considering major or minor in anthropology as well as nonmajors fulfilling general education requirement.

ANT 2301* Human Sexuality and Culture (3; also GE-D)
This course examines aspects of sexuality from a cross-cultural viewpoint and traces the development of an individual's sexuality and sexual identity. Sexual anatomy and functioning, gender roles and the interplay of behavior and sexual ethics are discussed.

ANT 2410* Cultural Anthropology (3; also GE-D)
The nature of culture. The content of cultures; languages, subsistence, economic structures, art and religion in human societies. The integration of culture.

Building Construction
BCN 1582* International Sustainable Development (3; also GE-N)
Provides an overview of international trends in reducing the environmental impacts of land development and construction. Surveys best practices in a dozen countries around the world.

Economics
ECO 2013* Principles of Macroeconomics (4)
The nature of economics, economic concepts and institutions; growth, unemployment and inflation; money and banking; economic policies; and the international economy.

ECO 2023* Principles of Microeconomics (4)
Theories of production, determination of prices and distribution of income in regulated and unregulated industries. Attention is also given to industrial relations, monopolies and comparative economic systems.

Education - Human Development and Organizational Studies
EDF 3110* Human Growth and Development (3)
A life span survey of human growth and development beginning at conception and ending with death. Students will have the opportunity to apply general principles in appropriate educational settings.

Education - Special Education, School Psychology and early Childhood Studies
EDF 2085 Teaching Diverse Populations (3; also GE-D)
A survey of educational demographics, foundations of prejudice, elements of culture, political and philosophical roots of diversity and commonality, exceptionalities, and barriers to cultural understanding and diversity in the classroom. A minimum of 30 hours of field experience is required with 15 hours in a diverse setting.)

EEX 2000* Impact of Disabilities: Home, Community and Workplace (3; also GE-D)
How disabilities impact the lives of individuals who have disabling conditions and how the presence of individuals with disabilities enhances diversity in a variety of settings. The impact of disabilities in home, community and work environments. Physical, cognitive and emotional/behavioral disabilities will be considered.

EEX 3093 Exceptional People in School and Society (3; also GE-D)
Persons with disabilities and people from other diverse groups and the services they need from school and society for success. Consideration of the abilities, causes and educational implications. May not be taken in lieu of EDF 2085.

European Studies
EUS 2003 European Experience: A Social Science Perspective (3; also GE-N)
Introductory interdisciplinary study of contemporary Europe from a social science perspective.

Food and Resource Economics
AEB 2014* Economic Issues, Food and You (3)
The role of agriculture and economics: The how's and why's of their influence on food prices and the world food situation, the environment, natural resources and government policy; and economic issues, including inflation and money.

AEB 2451 Economics of Resource Use (3)
An introduction to how economists value the environment and regulations designed to protect our natural resources from overuse and degradation.

Forest Resources and Conservation
FOR 2662 Forests for the Future (3)
Examination of current environmental issues that impact individual, community and institutional decisions about North American forest resources. Each issue will be reviewed with a framework that uses human behavior, policy options and media messages. Students will be expected to understand the issues and to discuss and analyze the major social and ecological variables affecting each issue.

Geography
GEA 1000* Geography for a Changing World (3; also GE-N)
The spatial organization of society. Emphasis is placed upon the political regions of the world.

GEA 3600 Geography of Africa (3; also GE-N; WR-6)
A comprehensive and systematic survey of the population, natural resources, geographic regions and potentialities of Africa and the significance of this region in the economic and political affairs of the world.

GEO 2410 Social Geography (3; also GE-D)
Introduction to geography as a social science. Various social concepts presented from a spatial perspective.

GEO 2420 Introduction to Human Geography (3; also GE-N)
An introduction to cultural geography with an emphasis upon the development and spatial arrangement of the major societies of the modern world.

GEO 2426 Pop Music and Culture: A Geographic Perspective (3)
An examination of the geographic origins, development and diffusion of contemporary pop music and the regional dynamics of pop music culture from the 1950s to present.

GEO 3611 Housing, People and Places in a Spatially Diverse America (3)
Examination of the housing, people and places that comprise the diverse contemporary human settlement patterns in the U.S. Topics focus on the quality of life found in the housing and neighborhoods of these urban and rural landscapes.

Health Education and Behavior
HSC 3102* Personal and Family Health (3)
A survey of personal health concerns: emotional health; aging and death; alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse; physical fitness; nutrition and dieting; consumer health; chronic and communicable diseases; human sexuality; and environmental health.

Latin American Studies
LAS 2001 Latin American Civilization (3; GE-H or S, and GE-N)
Interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Latin American societies and cultures. Provides general knowledge of Latin America and its people, preparing students for future course work in Latin American studies.

Political Science
CPO 2001* Comparative Politics (3; also GE-N)
The classification of political systems according to institutional and developmental characteristics. Causes and costs of political stability and instability. Comparison will relate to contemporary political institutions and processes in specific countries.

INR 2001* International Relations (3; also GE-N)
Examines philosophical, theoretical and methodological approaches to the student of international relations, the interaction of major global actors in the post-World War II and post-Cold War eras, the structure of the global economy and various issues such as arms proliferation and conflict associated with ethnicity and nationalism.

POS 2041* American Federal Government (3)
Basic principles of the Federal Constitution and Civil Rights. Political parties and the electoral process. The structure and machinery of the federal government, including Congress, the president and the judiciary.

POS 2112* American State and Local Government (3)
State constitutions, political parties and politics. State legislatures, courts and chief executives. The functions of state, city and county government.

Psychology
CLP 2001* Personal Growth (3)
Introduction to the concepts and techniques in psychology that apply to personal growth and development. All students have the opportunity to participate in research projects or alternative experiences.

CLP 3144* Abnormal Psychology (3)
The varieties of disordered experience and conduct, and their contribution to an understanding of more effective personal and social adjustment. Topics include the neuroses, psychoses and psychosomatic and conduct disturbances.

DEP 3053* Developmental Psychology (3)
Theory and research on psychological development from prenatal stages through adulthood.

PPE 3003 Psychology of Personality (3)
Development and organization of personality, description and assessment methods, results of research in personality structure and processes.

PSY 2012 General Psychology (3)
Introduction to psychology; this course is the prerequisite for advanced courses. Emphasis is on psychology as a research enterprise. Students are required to participate as subjects in psychological research or to write a paper on a psychological research article.

Sociology, Criminology and Law
CCJ 3024* Advanced Principles of Criminal Justice (3)
Advanced overview of criminal law, criminal procedure and criminological theory. Emphasis on the components of the criminal justice system: the police, the prosecutorial and defense functions, the judiciary and the field of corrections. This course is required of all majors.

CJL 2000* Law and the Legal Process (3)
Understanding the law as it relates to everyday encounters with the legal system. Actual legal cases may be studied to analyze how disputes are resolved by application of legal principles to factual situations, whether justice was served by the decision and the potential implications of the decision on future cases.

SYG 2000* Principles of Sociology (3)
Introduction to sociology as a social science and analysis of American society. Culture, socialization, deviance, bureaucracy, population, urbanization, social stratification, minorities and other topics.

SYG 2010* Social Problems (3; WR)
The development, analysis and treatment of social problems. Crime, poverty, prejudice and discrimination, pollution and environmental despoliation, drug abuse and mental illness. Emphasizes factors in U.S. society that cause social problems.

SYG 2430* Marriage and Family (3; also GE-D; WR)
Development of masculine and feminine roles. Recent changes in premarital interaction, such as dating, sexual involvement, coed dorm living, living together. Mutual adjustment and parenthood. Alternative family structures.

Tourism, Recreation and Sports Management
LEI 2181* Leisure Contemporary Society (3)
This course examines leisure as a condition of being human, as a cultural mirror and as a social instrument. The course reflects a wide range of literature from a number of academic disciplines.

Urban and Regional Planning
URP 3001* Cities of the World (3; also GE-N)
Comparative case studies of contemporary cities in the U.S. and a series of foreign countries, both industrialized and developing. Special consideration will be given to energy consumption.

Written and Oral Communication

COM 1000* Introduction to Communication Studies (3)
An introduction to various theoretical perspectives for understanding human communication.

Women's Studies
WST 2612* Social Science Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality (3; also GE-D; WR; not offered in fall)
The social construction of gender, sexuality, race, class and other identity categories. Readings focus on individuals, families and cultural groups, mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. The course emphasizes differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports and religion, as well as the potential of movements for social change.

WST 3015 Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women's Studies (3; GE-H or S, and GE-D; WR-4)
Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women in past eras and in the present, and in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the women's studies major and minor.

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Humanities Courses (GE-H)
An asterisk (*) indicates the course is taught in the Summer B term.
Many students choose to take foreign language at UF, and some majors require foreign language. You can discuss whether or not you will need to take a foreign language with your adviser at Preview. If you are interested in taking a foreign language, you can select up to two courses.

African-American Studies
AFA 2000* Introduction to African-American Studies (3; WR-4)
An integrated interdisciplinary exploration of selected themes and representative materials in the African-American experience in North America, emphasizing continuity and change.

Anthropology
ANT 2149* Lost Tribes and Sunken Continents (3)
This course examines the claims of popular writers in archaeology that mysterious archaeological sites, statues, etc. were influenced by outer space visitors. Problems of diffusion: discussed include Stonehenge, pyramids, Easter Island, Maya spaceships, Atlantis and Mu, Nazca Lines and other archaeological mysteries.

Architecture
ARC 1720 (ARC 1701 for majors) Survey of Architecture History (3; also GE-N; WR-varies by section)
A survey of monumental buildings and their embodied architectural intentions from the pre-historical ages to the current age. Demonstrating interactive relationships between form and idea in architecture throughout history across cultural and regional differences.

Art and Art History
ARH 1000 Masterpieces of Art (3)
Provides an appreciation and foundation in visual literacy and introduces students to the special character of the visual arts and to a vocabulary critical to analysis and interpretation of the masterworks of art.

ARH 2002* Introduction to Art: The Artistic Experience (3; also GE-N)
Introduction to the artistic experience through the examination of different ideas, approaches and purposes of art. Not counted toward the major.

ARH 2050* Introduction to the Principles and History of Art 1 (3; also GE-N)
Principles of art and relation of styles to cultural context. Introductory study of art and architecture from ancient times to the end of the Middle Ages.

ARH 2051 Introduction to the Principles and History of Art 2 (3; also GE-N)
Continuation of ARH 2050. Art and architecture from the Renaissance to the present.

Astronomy
AST 3043* History of Astronomy through Newton (3; GE-H or P, and N)
Astronomy from its beginnings through Newton. Emphasis is on the works of Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo and Newton,

Building Construction
BCN 3012* History of Construction (3; also GE-N)
Traces Western building technology from prehistoric man to the present. Development of the art and science of building.

Classics
CLA 2100* The Glory that was Greece (3; also GE-N)
A broad cultural view of the classical Greek world. Greek sources will be read in translation.

CLA 3111 Athens in Topography and Monument (3;)
Exploration of the topography and monuments of ancient Athens to understand social, historical, economic and religious institutions.

CLA 3160* Ancient Egypt (3; also GE-N)
Study of the civilization, culture and monuments of ancient Egypt from prehistoric times to the New Kingdom and Late period.

CLA 3433 The Athenian Democracy (3)
Study of ancient Athens from c.650-322 BCE, with attention to the political, social and cultural institutions of the democracy, drawing on primary sources and modern theory to explain democratic changes from the archaic to the classical period.

CLT 2044 English Vocabulary (3)
Historical study of the origins, development and lexicography of English vocabulary with emphasis on elements derived from Greek and Latin.

CLT 3291 Greek Drama (3; also GE-N; WR)
The classical Greek theater, archaeological remains of important theaters and selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes and Menander. All works will be read in translation.

CLT 3370* Myths of the Greeks and Romans (3; also GE-N; not offered fall)
Development, importance and influence of Graeco-Roman mythology. The main Greek and Latin literary sources will be read in translation.

Education - Teaching and Learning
EDF 3514 History of Education in the United States (3)
The development of American schools and major problems in American education, with emphasis upon the relationships among the schools, intellectual movements and social institutions.

English
AML 2070* Survey of American Literature (3; GE-C or H; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in the history of American literature. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

AML 2410 Issues in American Literature and Culture (3; GE-C or H; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the most important issues that arise in the study of American literature and culture. The breadth and focus of the topic will be determined by the instructor.

ENC 1145 Topics for Composition (3; GE-C or H; WR-6)
Instruction in expository-argumentative writing related to one special topic selected by the instructor. Readings will include variable genres from different disciplines.

ENG 1131* Writing Through Media (4; GE-C or H; WR-6)
This course is the media studies equivalent of ENC 1102, Writing About Literature. It explores the practices of literacy in the context of popular culture, including cinema, television, advertising, popular fiction and journalism.

ENG 2300* Film Analysis (4; GE- C or H; WR-6)
An introduction to thinking and writing about the cinema by means of film theory and history.

ENL 2012 Survey of English Literature: Medieval to 1750 (3; GE-C or H; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in the history of the period. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

ENL 2022* Survey of English Literature: 1750 to the Present (3; GE-C or H; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in the history of the period. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

ENL 2330 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
Course introduces students to the pleasure and wisdom of Shakespeare's plays. Various approaches will be used: movie versions of the plays, staging of scenes from the plays and discussion.

LIT 2110 World Literature: Ancient to Renaissance (3; GE-C or H, and N; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in the history of the period. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

LIT 2120 World Literature: 17th Century to Modern (3; GE-C or H, and N; WR-6)
Introduction to some of the major writers, issues and forms found in history of the period. The breadth and focus of this survey will be determined by the instructor.

History
AMH 2010* United States to 1877 (3; WR-2)
A survey of the development of the U.S. from its colonial origins to the end of Reconstruction.

AMH 2020* United States Since 1877 (3)
A survey of the emergence of modern America as an industrial and world power; the Progressive Era; WWI; the Great Depression and the New Deal; WW II; and the Cold War era.

EUH 2002 Western Civilization: Eighteenth Century to Present (3; also GE-N; WR-2)
Exploration of the e18th-century revolutions, Napoleon, romanticism and reaction, national unifications and imperialism, competing ideologies, the world wars and Europe in the postwar era.

Interdisciplinary Studies
HUM 2305 What is the Good Life (3)
Examines the enduring question, What is the Good Life? from the perspectives of the humanities. Topics include the cost of the good life, how people have chosen to live as members of local and global communities, and conceptions and expressions of beauty, power, love and health.

Interior Design
IND 1020 Design Innovation (3)
Overview of the interior design profession. The design of interiors to enhance human activity while observing life safety codes and human performance. Examination of significant interiors and furniture components in the design process.

IND 2100* History of Interior Design 1 (3; also GE-N)
History of interior spaces, design philosophy, interior elements in architectural and sociological context. Record of human achievement expressed in the built environment. Foundation for contemporary design and interior preservation practice. Ancient world through early nineteenth century. Slide lecture, discussion, outside research.

Landscape Architecture
LAA 2710 History of Landscape Architecture (3; also GE-N)
Landscape architecture is the art and science of arranging functions and spaces within the ecology of the land and the culture of the humans who inhabit it. Survey of the history of humans as it is expressed in such diverse areas as urban form, community planning, gardens, parks and recreational areas, agricultural patterns and land management. Open to all students.

Languages, Literatures and Cultures
HUM 2420 African Humanities (3; also GE-N)
A general education course similar in philosophy and purpose to the basic sequence. Content selected from the philosophies, literature, arts and music of various African countries and regions.

HUM 2424 African Cultures and Literatures (3; also GE-N)
A culturally based study of folktales, proverbs, drama, poetry and novels - and how these forms are used to portray African arts and ideas.

RUT 3441 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3)
Introduction to the major 19th century Russian novelists and their contemporaries. Readings and discussions in English.

RUT 3442 Themes From Russian Literature (3; also GE-N; can be repeated with change in content)
An examination of Russian everyday life and institutions of the 19th and 20th centuries through the media of literature and film.

RUT 3452 Russian Lit in the 20th Century (3; also GE-N; WR-2)
Authors, movements and genres in Russian literature from the Revolution of 1917 to the present. Readings and discussions in English.

RUT 3514 Russian Fairy Tales (3; also GE-N)
A critical introduction to Russian fairy tales and folklore and an examination of the aesthetic, social, cultural and psychological values they reflect.

Latin American Studies
LAS 2001 Latin American Civilization (3; also GE-N)
Interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Latin American societies and cultures. Provides general knowledge of Latin America and its people, preparing students for future course work in Latin American studies.

Linguistics
LIN 2000* Language: Humanities Perspective (3; also WR)
Language in use in areas of general interest to the humanities, including language, dialect and accent, language endangerment and language change.

Medieval and Early Modern Studies
MEM 3730* Holy Roman Empire (3; also GE-N; not offered in fall; can be repeated with change in content)
This variable content course examines the political and religious ideas and the literary and artistic productions associated with significant stages in the history of the Holy Roman Empire.

Music
MUH 2501 Introduction to World Musics (3; also GE-N)
Introduction to musics of non-western cultures in comparison with music of Western European civilizations; the nature of music and the realm of ethnomusicology.

MUH 3025* Popular Music in the USA: From Ragtime to Hip-Hop and Beyond (3; not offered in fall)
Survey of the musical styles, artists, audiences and eras of American popular music in relation to the social, cultural, political and historical contexts in which they emerged. Special attention is given to the diversity and intersecting nature of musical voices in the USA through the examination of musical styles including rock, rhythm and blues, country, punk, hip-hop, salsa and beyond.

MUH 4016* History of Jazz (3; also GE-N)
From African, Latin-American and Black American sources through contemporary development.

MUL 2010* Introduction to Music Literature (3; also GE-N; WR-varies by section)
A fundamental course open to all students (non-music majors) as an elective. Concert attendance, listening to records, reading and discussion.

MUN 1320 Women's Chorale (1)
Vocal training and public performances of standard female chorus repertoire.

MUN 1330 Men's Glee Club (1)
Vocal training and public performance of standard male chorus repertoire.

MUR 3104* Music and the Catholic Church (3; WR-4)
Examines the music of the Catholic Church from historical and artistic perspectives and presents issues that have surrounded major changes in the church's music. Focuses on six historical periods in which the church was significantly focused on musical developments or changes. Views the music from various cultural perspectives, primarily U.S. and European. Requires online computer proficiency and high-speed internet access.

MUT 1011* Introduction to Music Theory Rudiments (3; not offered in fall)
Students gain an understanding of music’s architecture on small and large scales. By learning both conceptual and applied approaches to rhythm, pitch and timbre, students prepare to analyze musical works from various times and places to be more informed, critical listeners and makers of music. Skills developed will include notation, ear training and compositional techniques.

Philosophy
PHI 2010 Introduction to Philosophy (3; WR-4)
A variable topics introduction to philosophy through study of traditional questions about the existence of God, the nature of the mind, the definition of good, freedom of the will and criteria of truth and knowledge.

PHI 2630* Contemporary Moral Issues (3; WR-4)
An introduction to moral philosophy through selected contemporary issues such as abortion, euthanasia, genetic engineering and the treatment of animals.

Plant Pathology
PLP 2000* Plants, Plagues and People (3; or GE-B; not offered in fall)
Biology and history of the human species for non-science majors. Course is presented chronologically from the origin of life to the present with emphasis on the impact that plants, animals and diseases have had and are having on human civilizations.

Political Science
POT 2002 Introduction to Political Theories (3)
Basic principles of political thought. Examination of the nature of the state and of the relationship between the individual and the state. Covers topics such as authority, consent, freedom and obligation.

Religion
REL 2071 Sustainability and Religion (3)
Examines the relationship between religion and sustainability and explores how the world’s different religious traditions address the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability. Topics include social and environmental justice, sustainable consumption and sustainable agriculture. Case studies highlight multiple religious perspectives, especially in Latin America and south Asia.

REL 2121 American Religious History (3; also GE-D)
An historical inquiry into the ideological origins and social context of American religious life.

REL 2240 New Testament (3)
An introduction to the various literary, social and religious contexts of the books of the New Testament.

REL 2300 Introduction to World Religions (3; also GE-N)
The origin, historical development and key figures, concepts, symbols, practices and institutions of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and East Asian traditions, including Taoism, Shinto and Confucianism.

REL 2315 Religion in Asia (3; also GE-N)
Study of the religious dimensions of human culture, focusing on Asia (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto).

REL 2362 Introduction to Islam (3; also GE-N)
Historical introduction to Islamic tradition. The foundational elements of the tradition, based on the life of Prophet Muhammad and the text of the Qur'an and on an examination of subsequent Islamic expressions.

REL 3148 Religion and Violence (3; also GE-N; WR-4)
Explores the problem of violence that springs from religious roots in Western, Asian, African and Native American traditions.

REL 3381 Religion in Latin America (3; also GE-N)
The main religious traditions in Latin America: native religions, Catholicism in its various forms, Protestantism and African-based religions.

REL 3563 American Catholicism (3; WR-4)
The American Catholic experience from an historical and sociological perspective.

Theatre and Dance
DAA 1000* Fundamentals of Dance Technique (3)
Practice and principles of fundamentals and stylistic characteristics common to ballet, jazz and modern dance.

DAN 2100 Dance Appreciation for the 21st Century (3; also GE-N)
A critical examination of dance as a form of communication and as an art; a cross-cultural survey of theories and styles of dance, their relationships to societal contexts and to other art forms.

ORI 2000* Oral Performance of Literature (3; not open to theatre and dance majors)
An introduction to the presentational mode of interpreting literature with emphasis on the improvement and application of vocal skills.

THE 2000* Theatre Appreciation (3; also GE-D)
Study of history, literature, forms, styles and philosophies of theatre from a humanistic approach.

TPP 2100* Acting for Non-Majors (3)
The foundation for all performance majors and students seeking entrance into the program. Introduces basic physical, vocal and analytical concepts, methods, vocabulary, discipline, and explores the creative process through exercises in observation and awareness.

Women's Studies
WST 2611* Humanities Perspective on Gender and Sexuality (3; also GE-D; WR-2)
This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the Internet, etc.) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class and race. The course will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news.

WST 3015 Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women's Studies (3; also GE-D; WR-4)
Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women in past eras and in the present, and in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the women's studies major and minor.

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Foreign Language Courses
An asterisk (*) indicates the course is taught in the Summer B term.

Classics - Greek
GRE 1120 Beginning Ancient Greek 1 (4)
Students learn the basics of ancient Greek grammar, morphology, syntax and vocabulary.

GRK 1130 Beginning Modern Greek 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, GRK 1131, constitute the basic sequence for development of overall skill in the language.

Classics - Latin
LAT 1120 Beginning Latin 1 (4)
The first of a 3-semester sequence for students with little or no background in Latin. Others enrolling in the course will be required to take it for an S-U grade.

LAT 1121 Beginning Latin 2 (3)
The second part of the sequence for students with little or no background in Latin.

LAT 1104* Beginning Latin 3 (3)
The third part of the sequence for students with little background in high-school Latin.

LAT 1130 Accelerated Beginning Latin 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, LAT 1131, constitute the basic sequence for development of overall skill in the language. Students are expected students to have little or no background in Latin.Others enrolling in the course will be required to take it for an S-U grade.

European Studies
HNG 1130 Beginning Hungarian 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, HNG 1131, constitute the basic sequence in Hungarian.

TUR 1130 Beginning Turkish 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, TUR 1131, constitute the introductory sequence in Turkish.

Spanish and Portuguese
POR 1130 Beginning Portuguese 1 (5)
First course in the basic Portuguese language sequence, which emphasizes the language as spoken in Brazil. Develops basic communication skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. This course is not open to proficient speakers of Spanish.

SPN 1130 Beginning Spanish 1 (5)
First course in the basic Spanish language sequence, developing basic communication skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Course meets three times weekly; students are required to work online for the remaining credit.

SPN 1131* Beginning Spanish 2 (5)
Second course in the basic Spanish language sequence, continuing development of basic communication skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Course meets three times weekly; students are required to work online for the remaining credit.

SPN 1134 Accelerated Spanish Review (5)
Provides a rapid review of basic communicative Spanish as preparation for intermediate Spanish courses. The course is for students with previous Spanish study but insufficient placement scores to move to the 2000 level.

Languages, Literatures and Cultures - Amharic, Akan, Arabic, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Haitian/Creole, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian, Swahili, Vietnamese, Wolof, Xhosa, Yoruba
AKA 1130 Beginning Akan 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

AHM 1130 Beginning Amharic 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

ARA 1130 Beginning Arabic 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

CHI 1130 Beginning Chinese 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Course materials are designed for learners with no prior exposure to the language. Students with native background or education for four years or more in a Chinese speaking country must take a placement test before enrolling in any Chinese language class.

CZE 1130 Introduction to Czech Language and Culture 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, CZE 1131, offer a comprehensive introduction to Czech, using interactive methods to develop competence in speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural interaction.

DUT 1130 Beginning Dutch 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, DUT 1131, constitute the basic sequence in Dutch for the development of overall skill in the language. Open to students with little or no background in Dutch.

FRE 1180 Elementary French: Review and Progress (3)
For students who have previous experience in French but who are not yet prepared for advanced elementary work in the language. FRE 1180 confirms overall skill in the language and prepares students for FRE 1131.

FRE 1182 Preparation for Intermediate French (3)
Alternative to FRE 1131 for students who have had four years of high school French or equivalent, but whose placement scores are not high enough for FRE 2200. This course combines the material of FRE 1130 and 1131 in one semester. Course meets three times per week. FRE 2200 follows this course in the sequence.

FRE 1130 Beginning French 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, FRE 1131, constitute the basic sequence in French for the development of overall skill in the language. Open to students with little or no background in French.

FRE 1131* Beginning French 2 (5)
Continuation of the basic sequence in French for the development of overall skill in the language. Open to students with little or no background in French.

GER 1125 Discover German 1 (5)
The first semester of a two-semester sequence that includes GER 1126. In this innovative online course, students will acquire basic skills in the German language and use the Internet as a resource to explore aspects of German culture and everyday life.

GER 1130 Beginning Intensive German 1 (5)
The first semester of a two-semester sequence that includes GER 1131. Emphasis is on spoken German. Reading, writing and grammar are also included in the program. Communication in German is enhanced by the use of multimedia and regular meetings with tutors. Supervised homework and drill sessions in small groups.

GER 1131 Beginning Intensive German 2 (5)
Continuation of series. Emphasis is on spoken German. Reading, writing and grammar are also included in the program. Communication in German is enhanced by the use of multimedia and regular meetings with tutors. Supervised homework and drill sessions in small groups.

HAI 1130 Beginning Haitian Creole 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, HAI 1131, constitute the basic sequence for development of conversational skills and grammar essentials in the language.

HBR 1130 Beginning Modern Hebrew 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed for students with no prior exposure to the language. Students with previous study of or exposure to Hebrew must enroll in HBR 2105 Hebrew for Heritage Learners 1.

HIN 1130 Beginning Hindi 1 (5)
Introduces reading, writing, listening and speaking with emphasis on acquisition of Devanagari script.

ITA 1130* Beginning Italian 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, ITA 1131, constitute the basic sequence in Italian. Emphasis on the development of broad competence in the language. Oral-aural approach ensures competence in the four skills.

JPN 1130 Beginning Japanese 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course has a strict attendance policy: If registered students miss two or more class meetings during drop/add, they may be dropped from the class upon notification by the instructor.

POL 1130 Polish Language and Culture 1 (5)
A two-semester Polish language sequence that introduces students to the basics of Polish language and culture.

RUS 1130 Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1 (5)
This course and its sequel, RUS 1131, offer a comprehensive introduction to Russian, using interactive methods to develop competence in speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural interaction.

SWA 1130 Beginning Swahili 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

VTN 1130 Vietnamese 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

WOL 1130 Beginning Wolof 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

XHO 1130 Beginning Xhosa 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

YOR 1130 Beginning Yoruba 1 (5)
Beginning course covering four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

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Elective Courses
An asterisk (*) indicates the course is taught in the Summer B term.

Agricultural Operations Management
AOM 2520* Global Sustainable Energy: Past, Present and Future (3)
Students will explore the global history of energy sources. New energy sources will be investigated and international solutions to future needs will be analyzed.

Animal Sciences
ATE 2511 Companion Animal Biology and Management (3)
Principles and practices of proper selection, care, nutrition, genetics, reproduction and training of companion animals, with emphasis on dogs, cats and selected bird species.

Anthropology
ANT 2140* Introduction to World Archeology (3)
The global study of human culture from its origins to the present through the recovery, description and analysis of archaeological remains.

ANT 3520* Skeleton Keys: Forensic Identification (3)
Survey of forensic anthropology, an applied field of biological anthropology, focusing the wider scope of skeletal biology on problems of medicolegal significance, primarily in determining personal identity and cause of death from human remains.

Biology
BSC 1920* First Year Introduction: Biology at UF (1; S-U only)
Introduces the field of biology and the academic resources specific to this discipline at UF. Discussions of the nature and practice of scientific research, laboratory safety, advising and career resources for biologists. Developments in the instructor's area of expertise will be used to illustrate key subjects.

Biomedical Engineering
BME 1008 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (1)
Introduction to and overview of biomedical engineering. Lectures will be given by faculty expert in an area of biomedical engineering. The goal is to give beginning students an appreciation for the breadth of the field and to guide them in making curriculum, major and career choices.

Botany
BOT 2710C Practical Plant Taxonomy (3)
Introduction to plant taxonomy including principles of systematic botany, nomenclature and classification, but emphasizing identification. Student will be able to identify the common ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms and flowering plants of field and garden.

Building Construction
BCN 1001* Introduction to Building Construction (1; S-U only)
This course will familiarize pre-construction students with the nature and functioning of the construction industry and the building construction curriculum. The specific safety regulations pertaining to the construction industry will be emphasized.

Civil and Coastal Engineering
CGN 2002 Introduction to Civil Engineering (1)
Introduces beginning students to the broad field of civil engineering.

Education - Human Development and Organizational Studies
SDS 3481* Alcohol and Drug Abuse (2)
General information of effects and problems associated with alcohol and other drug abuse.

SDS 3482* Stress and Anxiety Management (3)
Overview of theories and methods of stress and anxiety control and reduction.

Engineering
EGN 1002 Introduction to Engineering (1)
Introduction to the 11 departments that offer undergraduate degrees at UF. Students break into groups of 20, rotating weekly through each department. During these visits, students participate in hands-on experiments to help them make informed decisions about career alternatives.

Environmental Horticulture
ORH 1030 Plants, Gardening and You (1)
A non-majors overview of environmental horticulture that emphasizes the art and science of growing, installing and maintaining plants used to enhance and improve the human environment indoors and outdoors. Students gain familiarity with the science and the industries associated with environmental horticulture.

European Studies
EUS 3100 European Cinema (4; can be repeated with change in content)
A study of films of one or more of the historically important national cinemas in Europe. The course is taught in English.

First Year Florida
SLS 1102 Enhancing the Freshman Experience (1)
This course explores the purpose and philosophy of higher education in the US; the history and traditions of the University of Florida; the potential roles of a student within the university and other learning environments; and the resources, behaviors and skills necessary for successful higher learning.

Geography
GEA 3405 Geography of Latin America (3; WR)
Examines the interconnecting land, life and welfare throughout Latin America.

GEO 3427 Plants, Health and Spirituality (3)
Issues and controversies surrounding organic food, genetically-modified crops, medicinal plants, plants used to achieve altered states of consciousness and the importance of ornamental plants as inspiration for artists and in worship.

Health Professions
HSC 2000 Introduction to Health Professions (3)
Through lecture, discussion and group assignments, this course provides the opportunity to learn about different disciplines making up a health care team and their role in both the science and practice of health care.

Horticultural Sciences
HOS 1014 Vegetable Gardening (1)
A course primarily for non-majors who desire to learn the basic principles of vegetable gardening. A garden will be required of each student.

Journalism
JOU 1001 Introduction to Journalism (1)
Overview of journalism in its many forms. A series of professional journalists will introduce students to the news and information business. The course also offers preparation for a career in journalism.

MMC 1702* Rock 'n Roll and American Society (3; can be repeated for part 2)
Course studies the role of popular music in American culture. It is not a music course but a look at the effects of recorded sound on popular culture. Part 1 emphasizes rock 'n roll and its impact from 1954-1970. Part 2 covers 1970 to the present

MMC 2604* Mass Media and You (3)
Examines roles and effects of contemporary mass media on modern societies. Considers rights, responsibilities and ethics of media, explores relationships between governments, audiences and media companies and reviews economic, political and social determinants of media content.

Marketing
MAR 2290 Retail Management Seminar (1; can be repeated with change in content; S-U only)
A series of weekly lectures that features a different executive making a presentation in his/her area of expertise. Major issues in retailing are addressed. Discussions of career opportunities and career paths in retailing are included.

Materials Science and Engineering
EMA 1004 Materials Impact on Society (3)
The discovery and development of specific classes of materials are considered from the perspective of having dramatically altered the course of human history and societies. Materials will be presented in historical and technical contexts and considered in terms of their political, financial, health and technology impacts.

Microbiology and Cell Science
PCB 1051 Explore your Genome (3; online section only)
The genome sequence, how it is analyzed and its implications on human health. The course promotes genetic literacy.

Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management
LEI 2000 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure (3; non-recreation majors only)
Understanding the various roles that recreation has in contemporary society. Students have opportunity to examine recreation as a potential profession.

Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
WIS 2920 Wildlife Colloquium (1; wildlife majors/minors only)
Wildlife ecology and conservation as a major and career.

Written and Oral Communication
SPC 2300 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)
The study of how two people interact with one another and how factors such as listening skills, gender and culture influence that communication.

SPC 2351 Listening (3)
Theory and practice in responsible, participatory listening. Also includes principles of listening for literal comprehension and critical evaluation of ideas in response to various spoken and nonverbal messages.

SPC 2608 Public Speaking (3)
Theory and practice presenting public speeches, determining communication purpose(s) and adapting to organization, evidence, language and other message characteristics for designated audiences.

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Honors Courses

Students admitted to the Honors Program should take at least one honors course their first semester. While at Preview, honors students will have an opportunity to register for their honors course selection. To facilitate a smooth registration, however, you should review the list of available honors courses and rank your top four selections before coming to Preview. Remember, there is no way to know before you register if a particular course will fit your schedule or have seats available. Therefore, be sure to identify several alternatives.

(ENC 3254 Writing for Pre-Med, ENC 3254 Writing for Pre-Law and IDH 4917 Professional Development Strategies are not available for registration during Preview.)

Registration in honors courses at Preview is restricted to students already admitted to the Honors Program. However, UF students who were not initially admitted into the Honors Program will have the opportunity to apply to the program during their first semester. To learn more about the lateral admissions process for honors, please review the honors website and contact the honors program staff.

This information is subject to change.

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UF students talking together

Exploring careers early will give you confidence in your academic choices and will allow you more opportunities to gain experience in your field of interest through internships and volunteering. Start building your resume through internships and volunteering and see if a career path is right for you. You can get started through the many resources UF offers:

  • Career Resource Center
    The CRC offers services to help you explore careers, find internships and plan your future career search. The CRC is on the first floor of the Reitz Union.
  • Pre-Health Advising
    Considering a career in the health professions? UF's pre-health advisers can help you to prepare for and apply to a professional graduate program in the healthcare fields of dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, physical and occupational therapy, optometry, physician assistant and veterinary medicine.
  • Pre-Law Advising
    Considering law school? Get advice from pre-law advisers on on how to explore law as an option and the best ways to prepare.
UF students talking together

How To...

  • Adjust Your Schedule After Preview
    If you need to adjust your schedule you can do so during Schedule Adjustment, which occurs in late June for Summer B and in August for the fall semester (refer to your Preview workbook for exact dates).

    If you need to adjust your schedule before that because of new AP/IB/AICE scores, placement issues or changing a major, please email previewadjust@advising.ufl.edu from your GatorLink (ufl.edu) account.

  • After Your First Semester: The dates of registration, schedule adjustment and drop/add are published on the ISIS homepage and in the undergraduate catalog's Dates and Deadlines section. These pages also identify important dates such as the deadline to declare S-U (satisfactory-unsatisfactory) for an elective course, the deadline to drop or withdraw, etc. There are few, if any, exceptions to deadlines at UF, so be aware!

  • Read Your Degree Audit: Your degree audit shows all the requirements you must complete for the degree and plugs in the courses that you have taken or are taking that will meet those requirements. You can use your degree audit to plan your next term's schedule because it will show you what you still need to complete for your degree.

Where To Find...

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